Summer Courses

Topics vary. Using analytic skills learned in core courses, students work with an AUP faculty member, visiting scholar or professional in an area of current interest in the field to be determined by the instructor and the faculty of the Global Communications department.
“For the course description, please find this course in the respective semester on the public course browser: https://www.aup.edu/academics/course-catalog/by-term.”


From Wednesday, June 5, 2019 to Wednesday, June 26, 2019
RoomDayStart TimeEnd Time
Monday
01:00
01:30

Students may undertake an internship in an advertising agency, film company, or television company. The internship must be registered for 4-CR if the student decides to do an internship instead of the senior seminar. Students have taken internships at CNN, Harpers, Societe Francaise de Production, Le Courrier International, Sixty Minutes, European Broadcasting Union, amongst many others.


From Wednesday, June 5, 2019 to Friday, July 19, 2019

From Wednesday, June 5, 2019 to Friday, July 19, 2019

Fashion Theory: (Un)dressing the Self: Dress & Identity
Dress is representation and objectification of our identity. It enables and supports social roles and structures. It grants us individuality at the same time as confirming our group belongings. As the most visible form of consumption, the most pertinent type of non-verbal communication, dress fulfils a decisive role in the construction of social as well as individual identity, the reflexive production of self. This course examines dress and fashion as social and cultural phenomena. It will explore the ways in which different identity categories – social, individual, gender, class – are constructed through dress. Moreover, we will explore dress as a multi-sensory system in relation to the way we experience and construct our ‘selves’ and the world we live in – a fact often overlooked in our seemingly occularcentric culture. Focusing on the physical self, the physio-aesthetic effect of cloth/ing on our bodies will be considered, the symbiotic relationship between the moving body, dress, the skin, the senses, and the self.
Through the readings of some of the key (fashion) theorists (e.g. Anzieu, Barnard, Barnett, Barthes, Davis, Eicher, Entwistle, Eco, Evans, Featherstone, Finkelstein, Flugel, Foucault, Goffman, Kaiser, König, Lacan, Laver, Lindstrom, Lipovetsky, Pallasmaa, Phelan, Roach-Higgins, Simmel, Stone, Veblen, Vinken, Wilson) we will investigate motivations in dress, the communicative properties of clothes and how we perform ourselves by way of dressing every day, the Western hierarchy of the senses, and the construction of the self as a visual and tactile process and the role of dress within it.
In addition to textual and visual sources, this course will consider a series of films to explore dress as an embodied and situated practice, investigating the relevance of filmic representation for fashion-related research and analysis. In preparation of the written assessment, the course will include a workshop on visual analysis.


From Wednesday, June 5, 2019 to Wednesday, June 26, 2019
RoomDayStart TimeEnd Time
Monday
14:30
18:00
Tuesday
14:30
18:00
Wednesday
14:30
18:00
Thursday
14:30
18:00

This course examines the dynamics of the global media system. Students will gain a critical awareness of how international flows of information, entertainment and lifestyle values play a powerful role in shaping cultural and political realities. The concept of "soft power" is key in examining the influence of Western pop culture, whether as "imperialism" or as "globalization". The course examines soft power in various forms: Hollywood movies, television series, pop music, Disney cartoons, fast food such as Coca-Cola and McDonalds, and social media networks such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. The course also analyzes the influence of non-Anglo-American pop culture — from Turkish soap operas to Latin American "telenovelas".


From Wednesday, June 5, 2019 to Wednesday, June 26, 2019
RoomDayStart TimeEnd Time
Monday
10:00
13:30
Tuesday
10:00
13:30
Wednesday
10:00
13:30
Thursday
10:00
13:30

The NGO practicum is a course that prepares students to engage with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the field. It will introduce students to several important tools necessary to be reflective and responsible agents of social change. The course includes a series of preparatory sessions, which may include lectures, workshops, visits, and individual research assignments, followed by a period of overseas fieldwork in which students will collaborate with local NGOs to help create various project management tools or media projects.


From Tuesday, July 2, 2019 to Friday, July 19, 2019
RoomDayStart TimeEnd Time
Monday
14:30
18:00
Tuesday
14:30
18:00
Wednesday
14:30
18:00
Thursday
14:30
18:00

Topics change each semester- see the current Academic Schedule for current course descriptions.


From Wednesday, June 5, 2019 to Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Topics change each semester- see the current Academic Schedule for current course descriptions.


From Tuesday, July 2, 2019 to Friday, July 19, 2019
RoomDayStart TimeEnd Time
Monday
09:00
12:30
Tuesday
09:00
12:30
Wednesday
09:00
12:30
Thursday
09:00
12:30

At the end of the course work students have the option of completing a thesis or an 8-credit Internship.
In the last semester of their studies students may choose to complete a 14,000 to 20,000 word thesis (instead of an Internship). Additional paperwork available in the Office of the Registrar is MANDATORY for registration of the thesis.


From Wednesday, June 5, 2019 to Friday, July 19, 2019

In the last semester of their studies students may choose to complete an Internship (instead of a Thesis) with a corporation, international organization, government body or NGO - requires a 50-60 page report and represents 3/6 months' work. Registration of the internship is subject to the MA Program Director's approval. Please contact the Internship Office for more information.


From Wednesday, June 5, 2019 to Friday, July 19, 2019

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