GW PARIS SCHOLARS COURSE LIST – Spring 2020

October 10, 2019

 

GENERAL EDUCATION CATEGORY:  ARTS (Columbian College students ONLY - G-PAC)

**The Columbian College requires 1 Course from this category for graduation**

 

 

AH 1000  - INTRO TO WESTERN ART I 4 credits

Teaches the skills needed for an informed approach to art and architecture by introducing the salient concepts, techniques, and developments of Western Art. Studies works from ancient Greece, Rome, and the European Middle Ages in their K19 historical, social, and cultural contexts. Includes visits to museums and monuments in and around Paris.

GW General Education Note: Arts

GW Course Equivalency: AH 1031: Survey: Art & Architecture I

 

AH 1020  - INTRO TO WESTERN ART II 4 credits

Continues the study of the most significant monuments of Western painting, sculpture, and architecture, from the Renaissance to the 20th-century. Emphasizes historical context, continuity, and critical analysis. Includes direct contact with works of art in Parisian museums.

GW General Education Note: Arts

GW Course Equivalency: AH 1032: Survey: Art & Architecture II

 

AR 1061  - DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY 4 credits

This introductory course is an exploration of both technical and aesthetic concerns in photography. Using a digital camera, students will produce original work in response to a series of lectures, assignments, and bi-weekly critique classes. The course will cover the fundamentals of photographing with digital SLR’s, and students will learn a range of digital tools including color correction, making selections, working with layers and inkjet printing. After mastering the basics, students will work towards the completion of a final project and the focus of the remaining classes will be on critiques. Students will be asked to make pictures that are challenging in both content and form and express the complex and poetic nature of the human experience.Please note that an additional fee will be charged for this course.

GW General Education Note: Arts

GW Course Equivalency: FA 1502: Color Photography

Course Fee: 175

 

EN/CL 2100  - INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING: A CROSS-GENRE WORKSHOP 4 credits

In this course, students practice writing fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry while exploring the boundaries between genres. The workshop format includes guided peer critique of sketches, poems, and full-length works presented in class and discussion and analysis of literary models. In Fall, students concentrate on writing techniques. In Spring, the workshop is theme-driven. May be taken twice for credit.

GW General Education Note: Arts

GW Course Equivalency: ENGL 1210: Intro to Creative Writing

 

 

GENERAL EDUCATION CATEGORY:  SOCIAL SCIENCES (UNIVERSITY GE & G-PAC)

**GW requires 2 Courses from this category for all students for graduation**

 

 

AN 1002  - SOCIO-CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY 4 credits

Sociocultural anthropology is the comparative study of human societies and cultures.  This course is designed to introduce students to central areas of anthropological inquiry, a range of key theoretical perspectives and the discipline’s holistic approach.  Through field-based research projects, students will also gain familiarity with the discipline’s qualitative research methods (especially participant observation).   While students will encounter the works of key historical figures in the discipline, they will also discover current debates on globalization and transnationalism.   Finally, this course also strives to cultivate students’ ability to reflect critically on their own identities and cultures, thereby gaining a greater understanding and appreciation for diversity and an improved set of intercultural communication skills.

GW General Education Note: Social Sciences

GW Course Equivalency: ANTH 1002: Sociocultural Anthropology

 

CM 1023  - INTRO TO MEDIA & COMMUNICATION STUDIES 4 credits

This course provides a survey of the media and its function in today’s society. It introduces students to the basic concepts and tools necessary to think critically about media institutions and practices. In addition to the analysis of diverse media texts, the course considers wider strategies and trends in marketing, distribution, audience formation and the consequences of globalization. By semester’s end, students will understand the basic structures of today’s media and be able to provide advanced analysis that weighs the social and political implications of its products.

Prerequisite: EN1000 OR EN1010 OR EN2020CCE

GW General Education Note: Social Sciences

GW Course Equivalency: SMPA 1050: Media in a Free Society

 

CM 2001  - PUBLIC SPEAKING IN THE DIGITAL AGE 4 credits

Concentrates on the principles of communication in public speaking. Students learn and practice strategies and techniques for effective speech preparation and delivery of informative, ceremonial, persuasive, and impromptu speeches, and panel presentations. Helps students sharpen their oral presentation skills, express their meaning clearly, and become accustomed to public speaking.

Prerequisite: EN1000 OR EN1010 OR EN2020CCE

GW General Education Note: Social Sciences

GW Course Equivalency: COMM 1040: Public Communication

 

EC 2010  - PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS 4 credits

Focuses on the role played by relative market prices in our society and on the forces of market supply and demand in determining these prices. Since the actions of consumers and firms underlie supply and demand, the course studies in detail the behavior of these two groups.

GW General Education Note: Social Sciences

GW Course Equivalency: ECON 1011: Principles of Economics I

 

EC 2020  - PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS 4 credits

Examines the determinants of the levels of national income, employment, rates of interest, and prices. Studies in detail the instruments of monetary and fiscal policy, highlighting the domestic and international repercussions of their implementation.

GW General Education Note: Social Sciences

GW Course Equivalency: ECON 1012: Principles of Economics II

 

PO 2015  - COMPARATIVE POLITICS 4 credits

This course introduces students to the comparative study of politics, focusing on political behavior and the structures and practices that political systems have in common and those that distinguish them. We study different forms of democratic and authoritarian rule, state-society relationships, and key issues of political economy like development and welfare states. While the emphasis is on domestic features, we also analyze the impacts of globalization on national politics.

GW General Education Note: Social Sciences

GW Course Equivalency: PSC 1001: Intro to Comparative Politics

 

PY/GS 2045  - SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 credits

Studies the nature and causes of individual behavior and thought in social situations. Presents the basic fields of study that compose the science of social psychology, and how its theories impact on most aspects of people's lives. Topics of study include: conformity, persuasion, mass communication, propaganda, aggression, attraction, prejudice, and altruism.

GW General Education Note: Social Sciences

GW Course Equivalency: PSYC 2012: Social Psychology

 

SC 1020  - ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 4 credits

This course is intended to introduce non-scientists to key concepts and approaches in the study of the environment. With a focus on the scientific method, we learn about natural systems using case studies of disruptions caused by human activity. Topics include global warming, deforestation, waste production and recycling, water pollution, environmental toxins and sustainable development. The relationships between science and policy, the media, and citizen action are also addressed. Must take lab. Please note that an additional fee will be charged for this course.

Prerequisite (or Co-requisite): MA1005CCM OR MA1020CCM OR MA1025CCM OR MA1030CCM OR MA1091CCM OR ELECMA-30 OR CCMCCM

Co-requisite: SC1020LLAB

GW General Education Note: Social Sciences

GW Course Equivalency: GEOG 1003: Society and Environment 

 

 

GENERAL EDUCATION CATEGORY:  HUMANITIES (UNIVERSITY GE & G-PAC)

**The University General Education program requires 1 Course from this category, while the Columbian College (G-PAC) requires 2 Courses from this category for graduation** 

 

 

CL/DR 3038  - SHAKESPEARE IN CONTEXT 4 credits

Considers a selection of Shakespeare's plays in the context of the dramatist's explorations of the possibilities of theatricality. Examines how theater is represented in his work and how his work lends itself to production in theater and film today. Students view video versions, visit Paris theaters, and travel to London and Stratford-on-Avon to see the Royal Shakespeare Company in performance.

GW General Education Note: Humanities

GW Course Equivalency: ENGL 1340: Essential Shakespeare

 

PL 2070  - PHILOSOPHY OF MIND 4 credits

Systematic introduction to core questions of the philosophy of mind: What is consciousness? How does the mind relate to the body? How does the mind relate to the world through perception, thought, emotions, and actions? Case-based exploration of the consequences answers to these questions have for our conception of, e.g., reality, social relations, moral values, and a person or self.

GW General Education Note: Humanities

GW Course Equivalency: PHIL 1153: The Meaning of Mind

 

PL/PO 2003  - POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY 4 credits

Political philosophy forms that branch of philosophy that reflects on the specificity of the political. Why are humans, as Aristotle argued, political animals? How are they political? What are the means and ends of the political, and how best does one organize the political with such questions in mind? The course offers a topic-oriented approach to the fundamental problems underlying political theory and practice.

GW General Education Note: Humanities

GW Course Equivalency: PHIL 2132: Social & Political Philosophy

 

 

GENERAL EDUCATION CATEGORY:  QUANTITATIVE REASONING (UNIVERSITY GE & G-PAC)

**GW requires 1 Course from this category for all students for graduation**

 

 

MA 1020  - APPLIED STATISTICS I 4 credits

Introduces the tools of statistical analysis. Combines theory with extensive data collection and computer-assisted laboratory work. Develops an attitude of mind accepting uncertainty and variability as part of problem analysis and decision-making. Topics include: exploratory data analysis and data transformation, hypothesis-testing and the analysis of variance, simple and multiple regression with residual and influence analyses.

Co-requisite: MA0900 OR MA1005CCM OR MA1030CCM OR MA1091CCM OR ELECMA-25 OR ELECMA-30 OR ELECMA-20 OR MA1025CCM

GW General Education Note: Quantitative Reasoning

GW Course Equivalency: STAT 1051: Intro-Business & Economic Stat

 

MA 1030  - CALCULUS I 4 credits

Introduces differential and integral calculus. Develops the concepts of calculus as applied to polynomials, logarithmic, and exponential functions. Topics include: limits, derivatives, techniques of differentiation, applications to extrema and graphing; the definite integral; the fundamental theorem of calculus, applications; logarithmic and exponential functions, growth and decay; partial derivatives. Appropriate for students in the biological, management, computer and social sciences.

Prerequisite: MA1025CCM OR ELECMA-30

GW General Education Note: Quantitative Reasoning

GW Course Equivalency: MATH 1231: Single-Variable Calculus I

 

 

GENERAL EDUCATION CATEGORY:  UNIVERSITY WRITING (UNIVERSITY GE & G-PAC)

**GW requires all students to take UW 1020**

 

 

EN 1010 (Multiple Sections) - COLLEGE WRITING 4 credits

Taught through thematically-linked works of literature from the Ancient world to the present day. Stresses expository writing, accurate expression, and logical organization of ideas in academic writing. Recent themes include: Childhood, Friendship from Aristotle to Derrida, Social Organization and Alienation, Monstrosity, and Music and Literature. This course satisfies only 4 credits of the University's English requirement.

Prerequisite: EN1000 OR EN1010

GWU Equivalency: UW 1020 University Writing

 

EN 2020 (Multiple Sections) - WRITING & CRITICISM 4 credits

A series of topic-centered courses refining the skills of academic essay writing, studying a wide range of ideas as expressed in diverse literary genres and periods. Introduces the analysis of literary texts and gives training in the writing of critical essays and research papers. Recent topics include: Utopia and Anti-Utopia, City as Metaphor, Portraits of Women, Culture Conflict, and Labyrinths.

Prerequisite: EN1010

GWU Equivalency: UW 1020 University Writing

 

 

The following courses have been accepted by GW for transfer, however they do not carry any general education credit:

 

 

AB 1020  - ELEMENTARY ARABIC II 4 credits

AB 1020 seeks to give students grammar basics with which they can start to structure their knowledge and practice and make comparisons with other linguistic systems they know. The two conjugations, the two kind of sentences and other material allows the students to go further and to progress in organizing the new lexicon in order to produce sentences in Standard Arabic. The domain covered by the course starts from everyday life and aims to reach fundamental description vocabulary for all kind of documents :  dialogs, texts, songs, maps, school documents, proverbs, etc.

Prerequisite: AB1010

GW Course Equivalency: ARAB 1099: VT: Elementary Arabic II

 

AH 1003  - INTRO TO ART THROUGH PARIS MUSEUMS 4 credits

Uses the unsurpassed richness of the art museums of Paris as the principal teaching resource. The history of Western Art is studied through the close examination of a limited selection of major works in a variety of media. The works chosen illuminate the political, social and religious contexts of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Baroque and Rococo periods, and the modern epoch. The course has an extra course fee of 35 euros.

GW Course Equivalency: AH 1099: VT: Intro to Art Paris Museums

Course Fee: 35

 

AH 1030  - LES JEUNES ONT LA PAROLE 1 credits

Les Jeunes ont la parole is a program organized by the Louvre Museum, in cooperation with a dozen Parisian educational institutions including The American University of Paris, to attract the younger generation into its venerable walls. As part of the Louvre’s Les Nocturnes du vendredi, participating students dialogue with peers and other museum visitors around a work of art that he or she has studied in depth. A unique hands-on opportunity, the one-credit course involves preparatory meetings, preliminary research, Friday-evening presentations, and a final write-up.

GW Course Equivalency: AH 1099: VT: Les Jeunes Ont La Parole

 

AH 2000  - PARIS THROUGH ITS ARCHITECTURE I 4 credits

Investigates the growth patterns of Paris from Roman times through the Second Empire. Studies major monuments, pivotal points of urban design, and vernacular architecture on site. Presents the general vocabulary of architecture, the history of French architecture and urban planning, as well as a basic knowledge of French history to provide a framework for understanding the development of Paris.

GW Course Equivalency: HIST 3101: Topics: Europe

 

AN 2003  - POLITICAL ANTHROPOLOGY 4 credits

Using ethnographic case studies, considers issues of power and political institutions from the cross-cultural and holistic perspectives of anthropology. Discusses diverse definitions of power, authority, and charisma and relates them to the development of a variety of approaches in the field of anthropology, and the social sciences more generally.

GW Course Equivalency: ANTH 3506 Politics, Ethnicity, & Nationalism

 

AN/ES 3061  - ANTHROPOLOGY OF CITIES 4 credits

Presents an anthropological approach to the study of cities, providing students with theoretical and methodological tools to think critically about the meaning of urban life today. Approaches this topic from a cross-cultural perspective, with a number of readings focusing on Paris in particular. Students will undertake a Paris-based qualitative research project during the course of the semester.

GW Course Equivalency: ANTH 1099: VT: Anthropology of Cities

 

BA 2001  - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING 4 credits

This course introduces students to the financial accounting cycle and financial reporting for corporations. Students learn how to measure and record accounting data and prepare financial statements. At the end of the course, students choose a company and do an analysis of their financial statements, comparing their company against a competitor company, using financial ratios.

GW Course Equivalency: ACCY 2001: Intro Financial Accounting

 

BA 2002  - MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING 4 credits

Provides a basic introduction to the concepts of accounting for purposes of management control and management decision-making. Topics include: budgeting, budget variance analysis, cost-volume-profit relationships, product cost accounting, segment reporting and differential analysis.

Prerequisite: BA2001

GW Course Equivalency: ACCY 2002  Introductory Managerial Accounting

 

BA 2020  - MANAGEMENT & ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR 4 credits

The course introduces students to basic Management/Organizational Behavior concepts and enables them to understand the attitude and behaviors on the individual level and the group level within organizations. Students will be enabled to use Organizational Behavior tools and theories to recognize organizational patterns within a complex social situation. Students will be provided with readings, lectures, and cases that provide a diverse and robust understanding of human interaction in organization.

GW Course Equivalency: BADM 3103: Human Capital in Organizations

 

BA 2040  - MARKETING IN A GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT 4 credits

This introductory marketing course develops students’ understanding of the principles of marketing and their use in international business. Students learn how to collect and analyze data sets to make marketing decisions with the goal of understanding customers wants, demands, and needs; they learn marketing from a strategic and functional point of view. With a focus on problem solving, students work in multicultural teams cultivating a greater sensitivity to cultural issues while improving communication skills. Students will consider marketing in the French, US, and international marketplace.

GW Course Equivalency: IBUS 3201: International Marketing Mgt

 

CL 1050  - THE WORLD, THE TEXT, AND THE CRITIC II 4 credits

This team-taught course opens up a historical panorama of European literature stretching from the 18th to the 21st century. It does not pretend to provide a survey of this period but rather showcases a selection of significant moments and locations when literary genres changed or new genres appeared. The idea is to open as many doors as possible onto the rich complexity of comparative literary history. In order to help students orient themselves within various histories of generic mutations and emergences, the professors have put together a vocabulary of key literary critical terms in the fields of narrative structure, style, and rhetoric.

GW Course Equivalency: ENGL 1099 VT: World, Text, Critic II

 

CL 2054  - MODERN LATIN AMERICAN & SPANISH LIT. 4 credits

Traces modern continental and Latin American literature from the Molieresque comedy of Moratin to the magical realism of Garcia Marquez. Readings include Spanish authors (fiction by Galdos, Unamuno, Cela, Goytisolo), Spanish-American writers (poetry of Neruda, Paz and tales by Borges, Rulfo), and one Brazilian writer (Clarice Lispector). Conducted in English. Written work accepted in English or Spanish.

GW Course Equivalency: SPAN 3300: Span&LatinAmLit in Translation

 

CL 3063  - KAFKA AND WORLD LITERATURE 4 credits

Kafka’s work has left indelible traces in the pages of today’s most important novelists, in the West and beyond.  In this course we consider the meaning – and when relevant, the burden – of his global legacy.  Assigned readings include “The Metamorphosis”, The Trial and other seminal works by Kafka alongside an assortment of Kafka-inflected fictions from around the world.

GW Course Equivalency: ENGL 1099: VT: Kafka and World Literature

 

CM 1500  - DIGITAL TOOLKIT I 4 credits

In this digital tools training course, students will learn skills and gain hands-on experience with a range of digital publishing tools to build and curate a web platform with compelling, sharable content. They will become familiar with key storytelling platforms and technologies including Wordpress, Tumblr, Vine, Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. They will acquire hands---on experience with essential software including Adobe's Photoshop, Illustrator, Encoder, and Final Cut Pro; and they will learn to manipulate HTML and CSS with a basic Integrated Design Environment. In this highly hands---on course, students will learn basic web design and work collaboratively to create and launch a dynamic new digital brand online.

GW Course Equivalency: SMPA 1099: VT: Digital Toolkit: Comm Des

 

CM 1850  - MAGAZINE JOURNALISM PRACTICUM 2 credits

This workshop trains students in magazine writing and production through hands-on experience working on a high-quality student magazine, the Peacock. Students participate in a newsroom setting in a variety of roles -- from writing and editing to pagination and layout -- to produce the Peacock in both print and online versions. Students will learn researching and writing techniques as well as how to interview and source stories for magazines. They will gain pre-professional experience preparing them for entry-level positions in magazine journalism – whether print publications or online magazines. Note: Up to 8 credits for Journalism Practica can be applied toward the degree.

GW Course Equivalency: SMPA 2110: Intro to NewsWriting&Reporting

 

CM 1851  - ONLINE NEWS PRACTICUM 2 credits

This workshop trains students in online news writing and website curation through hands-on experience working on a news site in the style of Huffington Post, BuzzFeed, Daily Beast and similar sites. Students will participate in a variety of roles -- from editing and assigning to writing in specialized areas – to manage and curate an online news site in real time. Students will gain practical skills using different tools, including social media, while working a real digital newsroom setting. The course will prepare students for entry-level positions in digital journalism. Note: Up to 8 credits for Journalism Practica can be applied toward the degree.

GW Course Equivalency: SMPA 2112: Intro to Video Production

 

CM 1852  - VIDEO JOURNALISM PRACTICUM 2 credits

This hands-on workshop trains students in video journalism in a real-time newsroom and production studio setting. Students will gain skills working with video production equipment and editing tools including Final Cut Pro. Students will contribute video journalism pieces to “PTV”, the video platform linked to the student media website where their video work contributes to the content mix of news pieces, video work, and magazine stories.  Students will produce short video stories, narratives and interviews for the site. They will edit video pieces, post on YouTube, and use social media to promote their stories. The course will prepare students for entry-level positions in video journalism and for more advanced AUP courses in video and broadcast journalism. Note: Up to 8 credits for Journalism Practica can be applied toward the degree.

GW Course Equivalency: SMPA 2112: Intro to Video Production

 

CM 2004  - COMPARATIVE HISTORICAL COMMUNICATION 4 credits

This course provides historical background to understand how contemporary communication practices and technologies have developed and are in the process of developing and reflects on what communication has been in different human societies across time and place. It considers oral and literate cultures, the development of writing systems, of printing, and different cultural values assigned to the image. The parallel rise of mass media and modern western cultural and political forms and the manipulation and interplay of the properties and qualities conveyed by speech, sight, and sound are studied with reference to the printed book, newspapers, photography, radio, cinema, television, new media.

Prerequisite: EN1000 OR EN1010 OR EN2020CCE

GW Course Equivalency: COMM 1099: VT: Comp Hist Communication

 

CM 2006  - MEDIA GLOBALIZATION 4 credits

What is globalization? Why study the media? What is the relationship between the media and globalization? What are the consequences of media globalization on our lives and identities? This course critically explores these questions and challenging issues that confront us today. Globalization can be understood as a multi-dimensional, complex process of profound transformations in all spheres – technological, economic, political, social, cultural, intimate and personal. Yet much of the current debates of globalization tend to be concerned with “out there” macro-processes, rather than what is happening “in here,” in the micro-processes of our lives. This course explores both the macro and the micro. It encourages students to develop an enlarged way of thinking – challenging existing paradigms and providing comparative perspectives.

Prerequisite: EN1000 OR EN1010 OR EN2020CCE

GW Course Equivalency: SMPA 1099: VT: Media Globalization

 

CM 2012  - DIGITAL JOURNALISM 4 credits

This course is a workshop that will focus on training students for digital journalism. Students will learn writing, editing and curating skills for an online environment, notably in news, reviews, and opinion writing. Emphasis will also be placed on using online tools for researching and sourcing, as well as digital tools for graphics and big data.

GW Course Equivalency: SMPA 1099: VT: Journalism II

 

CM 2051  - COMMUNICATION THEORY & RESEARCH METH. 4 credits

The skills learned in this course will prepare students for upper-division communication courses, and provide students with basic research methods in the field of communication. Students will become familiar with a range of research methods (survey, interview, ethnography, discourse, and political economy.

Prerequisite: EN1000 OR EN1010 OR EN2020CCE

GW Course Equivalency: COMM 3110: Research Methods-Communication

 

DR/EN 2000  - THEATER ARTS 4 credits

Offers a practical workshop in the art of acting and dramatic expression. Students learn to bring texts to life on stage through a variety of approaches to performance. This course develops valuable analytical skills through play analysis, as well as building confidence in presentation and group communications skills through acting techniques and the rehearsal and performance of play scenes. May be taken twice for credit.

GW Course Equivalency: TRDA 1025: Understanding the Theatre

 

EC 2030  - INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL ECON. RELATIONS 4 credits

Deals with the mechanisms of international trade and finance. Topics covered include the theory of trade, commercial policy, the international monetary system, the balance of payments adjustments process, regional economic integration, and the role of international organizations in international economic relations.

Prerequisite: EC2010GE110 AND EC2020GE110

GW Course Equivalency: ECON 2180: International Economics

 

FM 1010  - MODERN FILMS & THEIR MEANINGS 4 credits

How do contemporary films make meaning? How does cinematic language convey emotion and raise ideas? how do we, as contemporary spectators, relate to and make sense of the screen? This course, while centered on contemporary films, is an introduction to cinematic language, its techniques, and the social and cultural factors that have made it one of the most influential art forms of our time. Looking at international films from just the last 20 years, we will explore and discover the ways these films creatively explore ideas and look at the technological, economic and political forces that fuel their production. Together with readings and screenings, individual and group assignments will help students deepen their understanding of lectures, readings and films and develop new critical skills and aesthetic understanding.

GW Course Equivalency: FILM 2151: Film Theory

 

FM 2076  - INTRO TO HISTORY OF NARRATIVE FILM II 4 credits

Analyzes classical Hollywood style from the 1940s onwards, looking at the work of some of the masters of the American system including Welles, Wyler, and Hitchcock. Studies postwar Hollywood genres including: film noir, the musical, the comedy, the Western, the gangster film, and sci-fi films. Traces important directions of postwar European Art Cinema (in particular Italian Neo-Realism and the Italian and French New Waves) and offers a brief overview of ‘new' cinemas worldwide. Explores the important developments that have taken place in Hollywood from the 1960s through to the present covering topics such as: New Hollywood cinema, the auteur renaissance of the seventies and eighties, neo-noir in the nineties, the digital age, and contemporary cinema.

GW Course Equivalency: FILM 2154: History of World Cinema II

 

FM 3076  - ARAB CINEMA 4 credits

An exploration of the Arabic-language film as entertainment, narrative and cultural event in the Arab Middle East and North Africa. Themes include cinema in the Arabophone socio-cultural context and film-producing institutions in national and pan-Arab culture. The final project is based on either visual analysis of an Arab film or an aspect of the politics of film making in the Middle East.

GW Course Equivalency: FILM 1099: VT: Arab Cinema

 

FM/CM 1019  - PRINCIPLES OF VIDEO PRODUCTION 4 credits

This course is designed to give you strong technical and conceptual skills in video production. Video and the moving image are everywhere in our world and a solid understanding of how they work will help you use them to pursue questions about the world around you. This course will prepare you for future video work in film, journalism, media and communications, studio art, and can be useful across many other disciplines on campus. You will learn to use the camera to raise questions and will work on several projects, each challenging you to explore new skills. Class time will be divided into lecture, screenings, in-class labs and critique. Outside class readings, shooting, editing and screenings will deepen your understanding.

GW Course Equivalency: SMPA 2112: Intro to Video Production

 

FR 1007  - INTRODUCTION TO PARISIAN CULTURE AND CUSTOMS 2 credits

In this course, you will become familiar with Paris and its residents, contributing to a global awareness and understanding of local habits, values, and way of life, as well as reflecting on your own. You will explore “the city of light” through a variety of in-class and outside activities and projects.

GW Course Equivalency: FREN 1099: VT: Intro Paris Culture & Cust

 

FR 1100  - FRENCH AND CULTURE I 4 credits

This course is an introduction to French and is intended to help students acquire the basic elements of spoken and written French. Students will learn how to express themselves in everyday life situations. The students’ basic needs for linguistic and cultural information will be the main focus of this course. In class, work will be supplemented by multimedia activities and real-life situations in the city of Paris.

GW Course Equivalency: FREN 1001: Basic French I

 

FR 1200  - FRENCH AND CULTURE II 4 credits

This course is a second semester Elementary French course, a continuation of level FR 1010 with emphasis on acquiring basic level of proficiency in the language and understanding the culture of France and the Francophone world. This course will enable students to improve their comprehension skills through the use of authentic audio and video material and to acquire vocabulary to face situations in their real life in Paris. The four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) are reinforced and special emphasis is placed on pronunciation.In-class work will be supplemented by multimedia activities and real-life situations in the City of Paris.

Prerequisite: FR1100 OR FR1200CCF

GW Course Equivalency: FREN 1002: Basic French II

 

FR 1300  - FRENCH AND CULTURE III 4 credits

The aim of the course is to improve and widen the listening, speaking and writing skills of those taking it, consolidating their knowledge of the full range of basic grammatical structures and broadening their general range of vocabulary.  By the end of the course, students should have reached approximately the level A2 standard on the Common European Framework References for Languages.

Prerequisite: FR1200CCF OR FR1300CCI

GW Course Equivalency: FREN 1099: VT: French Lang & Culture III

 

FR 2046  - PARIS VU PAR LES PHOTOGRAPHES 4 credits

This course is intended to expose students to the various neighborhoods of Paris. They will discover many aspects of the city - the unexpected, the hidden culture, and the everyday lives of Parisians by plunging into the works of Brassaï, Doisneau, Cartier-Bresson, Kertész, Lartigue, Sieff, Bourdin, Newton, Klein, Calle and other masters of photography. The course encourages students to develop their own creative process by producing porte-folios including both their photographs and their written texts on Paris.

Ce cours fait découvrir aux étudiants les quartiers de Paris, leurs aspects les plus insolites et les plus secrets mais aussi les plus quotidiens en les plongeant dans les univers de Brassaï, Doisneau, Cartier-Bresson, Kertész, Lartigue, Sieff, Bourdin, Newton, Klein, Calle et autres maîtres de la photographie.  Ce cours privilégie une démarche créative de la part des étudiants qui devront produire des photos et des textes sur Paris.

Prerequisite: FR2100CCI OR FR2200CCI

GW Course Equivalency: AH 1099 VT: Paris Vu Par Les Photgraphes

 

FR 2100  - FRENCH AND CULTURE IV 4 credits

This course reviews basic and complex sentence patterns in greater depth through discussions on students experience in Paris. Cultural and historical aspects of the French life are introduced. Students will learn additional vocabulary to express opinions, beliefs, doubts and emotions, and are shown various language registers (formal/informal vocabulary and structures) and intonations. Examples are taken from real life situations, film, television, newspaper articles, etc.The four language skills (listening, reading, speaking, writing) will be reinforced.

Prerequisite: FR1300CCI OR FR2100CCI

GW Course Equivalency: FREN 1003: Intermediate French I

 

FR 2200  - FRENCH AND CULTURE V 4 credits

This high intermediate course allows students to reinforce and expand their ability to express themselves, defend an opinion, and debate with others. Special attention is paid to increasing students' ability to form complex sentences to express attitudes, wishes, necessity, doubt, emotions, to link ideas and to speculate.

Prerequisite: FR2100CCI OR FR2200CCI

GW Course Equivalency: FREN 1004: Intermediate French II

 

HI 1003  - THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD 4 credits

Beginning with the bipolar world of the Cold War, focuses on ideological struggles of the West, East, and Third World and the reactions of nations to the politics of the superpowers. Topics range from decolonization to the rise of the new Asia, African independence, the reemergence of the Muslim world, the collapse of communism, globalization and clash of world cultures.

GW Course Equivalency: HIST 1099: VT: The Contemporary World

 

HI 1009  - HISTORY OF ASIAN CIVILIZATION II 4 credits

This course examines the major development of civilizations in East Asia from the 16th century to the present. We will examine the histories of China, Korea, Japan, focusing primarily on China. You will also be asked to think comparatively, examining not only how the different countries and regions developed in East Asia, but also how East Asian developments compare with the “West.”

GW Course Equivalency: HIST 3601: Topics: Asian History

 

HI 1016  - HISTORY OF THE MIDDLE EAST II 4 credits

This course examines the historical development of the Middle East from the rise of the Ottoman Empire to its decline, and later from colonial rule to national independences. It covers the Arab World, Turkey and Iran and follows four main general themes: Reform, Colonialism, Nationalism and Revolution.  The course is divided into two main sections which are organised chronologically and thematically.  The first part of the course deals with the formation of the Ottoman Empire, its expansion, and the rise of Safavids in Persia. It then covers the reform movements in the Ottoman and Persian (Qajar) Empires, the influence of Europe and the political and social upheaval brought about by the outbreak of revolutions in the early 20th century. Indigenous responses to European penetration and indigenous reform are analysed through an understanding of revolutionary movements, and the rise of nationalism.  The second part of the course examines the emergence of states in the Arab World, the British French accords and declarations, the question of Palestine and the Zionist activism and the debates around Secularism vs. Islam.

GW Course Equivalency: HIST 3801: Topics: Middle East

 

LW/HI 2020  - THE HISTORICAL FOUNDATIONS OF LAW 4 credits

This course is designed to introduce students to the historical foundations of legal thought and to cultivate literacy in legal reasoning. The course provides an essential resource for our future global citizens by exploring key legal texts, histories and cases and familiarizing students with the historical origins of key contemporary legal issues.

GW Course Equivalency: IDIS 1099: VT: Historical Found of Law

 

ME 2010  - SITUATING THE MIDDLE EAST I 4 credits

The Middle East is a region of great diversity with different histories, cultures, languages and populations. It constitutes nevertheless a systematic entity, with close interrelations, and many common political, cultural and socio-economical challenges. The course will explore the cultural, political, ethnic and geographical realities of the region (historically and in the present). It will present as well the ongoing debates and themes in major political and cultural circles.

GW Course Equivalency: IDIS 1099: VT: Situating the Mid East I

 

ME 2030  - ENCOUNTERS BETWEEN THE MIDDLE EAST AND THE WEST 4 credits

The “Middle East” and the “West” (as two political/cultural entities) have been involved in a long history of conflicts, concurrence, hegemony, and fascination. The course will explore the different aspects of the contemporary Middle East/West relation, and will explain its origins and historical evolution.

GW Course Equivalency: IAFF 1099: VT: The Middle East & the West

 

PL 1200  - HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY II 4 credits

Formerly PL2022. This course aims to provide a solid and comprehensive grounding in modern philosophy focusing on the main issues and theories of late Renaissance philosophy, modern Rationalism and Empiricism, philosophies of the Enlightenment, Critical philosophy, modern Idealism, Phenomenology and some questions of analytic philosophy. It offers an introduction to the works of the major figures of this tradition.

GW Course Equivalency: PHIL 2112: History of Modern Philosophy

 

PL 2071  - CRITIQUE OF POLITICAL ECONOMY 4 credits

The course focuses on the impact of the emergent discipline of political economy on modern philosophy. A brief overview of the work of Adam Smith and David Ricardo will introduce the concerns of political economy before the course focuses on Karl Marx's attempt to re-orientate philosophy through the critique of political economy.

GW Course Equivalency: PSC 2439: International Political Econ

 

PO 1011 - FOUNDATIONS OF MODERN POLITICS 4 credits

What is politics - the quest for the common good or who gets what, when, and how? We study what defines politics in the modern age: states and nations in the international system, collective action and representation in mass societies, trajectories of democracy and dictatorship, politics and development in the context of capitalism. The course will introduce the student to the concerns, the language and the methods of Political Science.

GW Course Equivalency: PSC 1099 VT: Foundations of Modern Politics

 

PO 2031  - WORLD POLITICS 4 credits

This course analyses the basic setting, structure and dynamics of world politics with emphasis on current global problems, practices and processes. In doing so, it introduces the major theoretical approaches to international politics, and uses theory as a methodological tool for analyzing sources of change and causes of conflict and/or cooperation in the global arena.

GW Course Equivalency: PSC 1003: Intro-International Politics

 

PO 2050  - POLITICAL ANALYSIS 4 credits

This course examines the nature of knowledge claims in political science: how we know what we know and how certain we are. Research schools, the nature of description and explanation in political science, and basis issues of quantitative analysis will form the core elements of this course, while substantive themes may vary each year.

GW Course Equivalency: PSC 2101: Scope & Methods in PSc

 

PY 1000  - INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY 4 credits

This course discusses the intellectual foundations of contemporary psychology. Students learn about the concepts, theories and experiments basic to an understanding of the discipline, including classic thought and recent advances in psychology such as psychoanalysis, learning theory,biological mechanisms, developmental, social, cognitive, personality and abnormal psychology.

GW Note: PSYC 1001 is a prerequisite for all Psychology courses.

GW Course Equivalency: PSYC 1001: General Psychology

 

PY 2046  - CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 credits

Human beings are cultural beings. We cannot understand human nature without understanding its cultural fabric. We cannot understand ourselves and our being in the world without understanding this world as a cultural world, in fact, as consisting of multiple cultural worlds in which we live at the same time. In this course, we inquire why the cultural dimension is crucial for human psychology. To this purpose, we explore a number of cultural worlds, Western and non-Western. We also investigate various psychological functions such as thinking and consciousness, remembering and memory, and self-construction and identity. And we look at different cultural sign and symbol systems such as language, art, literature, and film. In this way, the course also offers the opportunity to think about our own cultural existence and the way we view ourselves and others.

Prerequisite: College Level=Sophomore OR PY1000CCI

GW Course Equivalency: PSYC 3125: Cross-Cultural Psychology

 

SC 1060  - PHYSICS OF NATURAL & UNNATURAL DISASTERS 4 credits

Managing risk associated with natural environmental disasters (volcanoes, hurricanes, tornadoes, tsunamis, etc.) and unnatural disasters (oil spills, nuclear fallout, toxic spills, groundwater exhaustion, eutrophication, global warming) is a fundamental aspect of environmental policy.  In this course, students will learn about the underlying physical processes of the most common and costly environmental disasters afflicting society today, and will examine historical landmark cases, discussing damage cost models (infrastructure, life, ecosystem) and risk minimization strategies (relocation, protection, resource or technology discontinuation).

GW Course Equivalency: GEOG 2137: Environmental Hazards