GW PARIS SCHOLARS COURSE LIST – FALL 2020

Updated:  June 26, 2020

 

GENERAL EDUCATION CATEGORY:  ARTS (COLUMBIAN COLLEGE STUDENTS ONLY - G-PAC)

**The Columbian College requires 1 Course from this category for graduation**

 

AH 1020  - INTRO TO WESTERN ART II 4 credits

Continues the study of the most significant monuments of Western painting, sculpture, and architecture, from the Renaissance to the 20th-century. Emphasizes historical context, continuity, and critical analysis. Includes direct contact with works of art in Parisian museums.

GW Equivalency: AH 1032 Survey: Art & Architecture II

GW General Education Category: Arts

 

AR 1015  - PAINTING I 4 credits

For students with little or no previous experience in drawing or painting. First analyzes still life objects in basic plastic terms starting with value. Concentrates during each class session on a new painterly quality until a sufficient visual vocabulary is achieved so that more complicated subjects such as the nude can be approached. Work will be done in oil.

GW Equivalency: FA 1401 Painting: Visual Thinking

GW General Education Category: Arts

Course Fee: 52

 

AR 1061  - DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY 4 credits

This introductory course is an exploration of both technical and aesthetic concerns in photography. Using a digital camera, students will produce original work in response to a series of lectures, assignments, and bi-weekly critique classes. The course will cover the fundamentals of photographing with digital SLR’s, and students will learn a range of digital tools including color correction, making selections, working with layers and inkjet printing. After mastering the basics, students will work towards the completion of a final project and the focus of the remaining classes will be on critiques. Students will be asked to make pictures that are challenging in both content and form and express the complex and poetic nature of the human experience.Please note that an additional fee will be charged for this course.

GW Equivalency: FA 1502 Color Photography

GW General Education Category: Arts

Course Fee: 75

 

EN/CL 2100  - INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING: A CROSS-GENRE WORKSHOP 4 credits

In this course, students practice writing fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry while exploring the boundaries between genres. The workshop format includes guided peer critique of sketches, poems, and full-length works presented in class and discussion and analysis of literary models. In Fall, students concentrate on writing techniques. In Spring, the workshop is theme-driven. May be taken twice for credit.

GW Equivalency: ENGL 1210 Intro to Creative Writing

GW General Education Category: Arts

 

GENERAL EDUCATION CATEGORY:  QUANTITATIVE REASONING (UNIVERSITY GE & G-PAC)

**GW requires 1 Course from this category for all students for graduation**

 

MA 1020  - APPLIED STATISTICS I 4 credits

Introduces the tools of statistical analysis. Combines theory with extensive data collection and computer-assisted laboratory work. Develops an attitude of mind accepting uncertainty and variability as part of problem analysis and decision-making. Topics include: exploratory data analysis and data transformation, hypothesis-testing and the analysis of variance, simple and multiple regression with residual and influence analyses.

Prerequisite: Must have a math placement into or above MA 1020 (MA0900 OR MA1005CCM OR MA1030CCM OR MA1091CCM OR ELECMA-25 OR ELECMA-30 OR ELECMA-20 OR MA1025CCM)

GW Equivalency: STAT 1051 Intro-Business & Economic Stat (for Business Majors) or STAT 1053 Intro-Stat in Social Science (for Arts & Science Majors)

GW General Education Category: Quantitative Reasoning

 

MA 1030  - CALCULUS I 4 credits

Introduces differential and integral calculus. Develops the concepts of calculus as applied to polynomials, logarithmic, and exponential functions. Topics include: limits, derivatives, techniques of differentiation, applications to extrema and graphing; the definite integral; the fundamental theorem of calculus, applications; logarithmic and exponential functions, growth and decay; partial derivatives. Appropriate for students in the biological, management, computer and social sciences.

Prerequisite: Must have a math placement into MA 1030 (MA1025CCM OR ELECMA-30)

GW Equivalency: MATH 1231 Single-Variable Calculus I

GW General Education Category: Quantitative Reasoning

 

GENERAL EDUCATION CATEGORY:  SOCIAL SCIENCES (UNIVERSITY GE & G-PAC)

**GW requires 2 Courses from this category for all students for graduation**

 

AN 1002  - SOCIO-CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY 4 credits

Sociocultural anthropology is the comparative study of human societies and cultures.  This course is designed to introduce students to central areas of anthropological inquiry, a range of key theoretical perspectives and the discipline’s holistic approach.  Through field-based research projects, students will also gain familiarity with the discipline’s qualitative research methods (especially participant observation).   While students will encounter the works of key historical figures in the discipline, they will also discover current debates on globalization and transnationalism.   Finally, this course also strives to cultivate students’ ability to reflect critically on their own identities and cultures, thereby gaining a greater understanding and appreciation for diversity and an improved set of intercultural communication skills.

GW Equivalency: ANTH 1002 Sociocultural Anthropology

GW General Education Category: Social Sciences

 

CM 1011  - JOURNALISM: WRITING & REPORTING 4 credits

The introductory course provides students with basic training in writing and reporting in all forms of journalism, print and online. The course gives students with a grounding in the basic principles and practices of the journalism profession: accuracy, fairness, objectivity. Students will learn journalistic writing techniques as well as style and tone. They will analyze possible sources, define angles, and learn to write a hard news story. The course will provide workshop training for students involved in ASM courses focused on the Peacock Plume website.

Prerequisite: EN1000 OR EN1010 OR EN2020CCE

GW Equivalency: SMPA 2101 Journalism: Theory & Practice

GW General Education Category: Social Sciences

 

CM 1023  - INTRO TO MEDIA & COMMUNICATION STUDIES 4 credits

This course provides a survey of the media and its function in today’s society. It introduces students to the basic concepts and tools necessary to think critically about media institutions and practices. In addition to the analysis of diverse media texts, the course considers wider strategies and trends in marketing, distribution, audience formation and the consequences of globalization. By semester’s end, students will understand the basic structures of today’s media and be able to provide advanced analysis that weighs the social and political implications of its products.

Prerequisite: EN1000 OR EN1010 OR EN2020CCE

GW Equivalency: SMPA 1050 Media in a Free Society

GW General Education Category: Social Sciences

 

CM 2001  - PUBLIC SPEAKING IN THE DIGITAL AGE 4 credits

Concentrates on the principles of communication in public speaking. Students learn and practice strategies and techniques for effective speech preparation and delivery of informative, ceremonial, persuasive, and impromptu speeches, and panel presentations. Helps students sharpen their oral presentation skills, express their meaning clearly, and become accustomed to public speaking.

Prerequisite: EN1000 OR EN1010 OR EN2020CCE

GW Equivalency: COMM 1040 Public Communication

GW General Education Category: Social Sciences

 

EC 2010  - PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS 4 credits

Focuses on the role played by relative market prices in our society and on the forces of market supply and demand in determining these prices. Since the actions of consumers and firms underlie supply and demand, the course studies in detail the behavior of these two groups.

GW Equivalency: ECON 1011 Principles of Economics I

GW General Education Category: Social Sciences

 

EC 2020  - PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS 4 credits

Examines the determinants of the levels of national income, employment, rates of interest, and prices. Studies in detail the instruments of monetary and fiscal policy, highlighting the domestic and international repercussions of their implementation.

GW Equivalency: ECON 1012 Principles of Economics II

GW General Education Category: Social Sciences

 

PO 2015  - COMPARATIVE POLITICS 4 credits

This course introduces students to the comparative study of politics, focusing on political behavior and the structures and practices that political systems have in common and those that distinguish them. We study different forms of democratic and authoritarian rule, state-society relationships, and key issues of political economy like development and welfare states. While the emphasis is on domestic features, we also analyze the impacts of globalization on national politics.

GW Equivalency: PSC 1001 Intro to Comparative Politics

GW General Education Category: Social Sciences

 

GENERAL EDUCATION CATEGORY:  UNIVERSITY WRITING (UNIVERSITY GE & G-PAC)

**GW requires all students to take UW 1020**

 

EN 1000  - PRINCIPLES OF ACADEMIC WRITING 4 credits

Emphasizes the stages required to produce a polished, articulate essay by practicing the necessary components of excellent academic writing: sharpening critical thinking skills, organizing ideas, choosing appropriate and dynamic words, varying prose style, editing, refining, and proofreading. Although this course carries 4 credits, it does not fulfill the University's English requirement.

Prerequisite: EN0950 (OR English Placement Result into EN 1000 or above)

GW Equivalency: UW 1020 University Writing

 

EN 1010  - COLLEGE WRITING 4 credits

Taught through thematically-linked works of literature from the Ancient world to the present day. Stresses expository writing, accurate expression, and logical organization of ideas in academic writing. Recent themes include: Childhood, Friendship from Aristotle to Derrida, Social Organization and Alienation, Monstrosity, and Music and Literature. This course satisfies only 4 credits of the University's English requirement.

Prerequisite: EN1000 OR EN1010 OR EN2020CCE (OR English Placement Result into EN 1010 or above)

GW Equivalency: UW 1020 University Writing

 

EN 2020  - WRITING & CRITICISM 4 credits

A series of topic-centered courses refining the skills of academic essay writing, studying a wide range of ideas as expressed in diverse literary genres and periods. Introduces the analysis of literary texts and gives training in the writing of critical essays and research papers. Recent topics include: Utopia and Anti-Utopia, City as Metaphor, Portraits of Women, Culture Conflict, and Labyrinths.

Prerequisite: EN1010 (OR English Placement Result into EN 2020)

GW Equivalency: UW 1020 University Writing

 

THE FOLLOWING COURSES HAVE BEEN ACCEPTED BY GW FOR TRANSFER, HOWEVER THEY DO NOT CARRY ANY GENERAL EDUCATION CREDIT:

 

AB 1010  - ELEMENTARY ARABIC I 4 credits

This course is designed to familiarize beginners with the Arabic alphabet system and Arabic writing as well as provide the basis for limited conversation.

GW Equivalency: ARAB 1099 VT: Elementary Arabic I

 

AH 1003  - INTRO TO ART THROUGH PARIS MUSEUMS 4 credits

Uses the unsurpassed richness of the art museums of Paris as the principal teaching resource. The history of Western Art is studied through the close examination of a limited selection of major works in a variety of media. The works chosen illuminate the political, social and religious contexts of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Baroque and Rococo periods, and the modern epoch. The course has an extra course fee of 35 euros.

GW Equivalency: AH 1099 VT:Intro to Art Paris Museums

Course Fee: 35

 

AH 1030  - LES JEUNES ONT LA PAROLE 1 credit

Les Jeunes ont la parole is a program organized by the Louvre Museum, in cooperation with a dozen Parisian educational institutions including The American University of Paris, to attract the younger generation into its venerable walls. As part of the Louvre’s Les Nocturnes du vendredi, participating students dialogue with peers and other museum visitors around a work of art that he or she has studied in depth. A unique hands-on opportunity, the one-credit course involves preparatory meetings, preliminary research, Friday-evening presentations, and a final write-up.

GW Equivalency: AH 1099 VT: Les Jeunes Ont La Parole

 

AH 2000  - PARIS THROUGH ITS ARCHITECTURE I 4 credits

Investigates the growth patterns of Paris from Roman times through the Second Empire. Studies major monuments, pivotal points of urban design, and vernacular architecture on site. Presents the general vocabulary of architecture, the history of French architecture and urban planning, as well as a basic knowledge of French history to provide a framework for understanding the development of Paris.

GW Equivalency: HIST 3101 Topics: Europe

Course Fee: 20

 

BA 2001  - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING 4 credits

This course introduces students to the financial accounting cycle and financial reporting for corporations. Students learn how to measure and record accounting data and prepare financial statements. At the end of the course, students choose a company and do an analysis of their financial statements, comparing their company against a competitor company, using financial ratios.

GW Equivalency: ACCY 2001 Intro Financial Accounting

 

BA 2020  - MANAGEMENT & ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR 4 credits

The course introduces students to basic Management/Organizational Behavior concepts and enables them to understand the attitude and behaviors on the individual level and the group level within organizations. Students will be enabled to use Organizational Behavior tools and theories to recognize organizational patterns within a complex social situation. Students will be provided with readings, lectures, and cases that provide a diverse and robust understanding of human interaction in organization.

GW Equivalency: BADM 3103 Human Capital in Organizations

 

BA 2040  - MARKETING IN A GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT 4 credits

This introductory marketing course develops students’ understanding of the principles of marketing and their use in international business. Students learn how to collect and analyze data sets to make marketing decisions with the goal of understanding customers wants, demands, and needs; they learn marketing from a strategic and functional point of view. With a focus on problem solving, students work in multicultural teams cultivating a greater sensitivity to cultural issues while improving communication skills. Students will consider marketing in the French, US, and international marketplace.

GW Equivalency: IBUS 3201 International Marketing Mgt

 

BA 2050  - CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION MANAGEMENT 4 credits

The course introduces the foundations of managing creativity and innovation. The readings and discussion will focus on the concepts and frameworks for analysing how firms create, commercialize and capture value from innovative products and services.

The aim of this course is to provide a solid grounding to students interested in managing creativity and the various aspects of the innovation process within organizations. The course is divided into two parts. The first part focuses mainly on the creativity process around three themes: What is creativity? How can creativity be stimulated? How can creative ideas be translated to innovative products and business strategies? Based on major theories in the field, we discuss whether monetary rewards enhance or undermine creativity, how multitasking or working under time pressure affects creativity, what tools we can provide to stimulate creativity, and the challenges that arise when implementing creative ideas in organizations. The second part of the course examines the organizational issues involved in innovating and in implementing innovations. These issues include management of teams and partnerships, learning within and across projects, the manager's role in funding, directing, and killing innovation projects, technological entrepreneurship, and resistance to innovation.

GW Equivalency: BADM 1099 VT: Creativity & Innnov Mgmt

 

CL 3035  - CONTEMPORARY WORLD LITERATURE 4 credits

This course offers close engagement with recently translated fiction and poetry from around the globe.  In addition to reading great contemporary writing, students are introduced to today’s new media landscape, which has taken on an increasingly important role in the promotion and evaluation of global literature.  Units on the Middle East, Africa, Asia, Latin America and Europe.

GW Equivalency: ENGL 1099 VT: Contemp World Lit

 

CL/FR 2010  - PARIS THROUGH ITS BOOKS 4 credits

Examines how experiences of Paris have been committed to the page from the first century to the present.  Considers the uses and effects of overviews, street-level accounts, and underground approaches to describing the city and its inhabitants.  Includes visits to the sewers and museums, revolutionary sites and archives, with multiple members of the comparative literature faculty speaking on their areas of expertise. http://www.aup.edu/paris-through-its-books

GW Equivalency: IDIS 1099 VT: Paris through its Books

 

CM 1850  - MAGAZINE JOURNALISM PRACTICUM 2 credits

This workshop trains students in magazine writing and production through hands-on experience working on a high-quality student magazine, the Peacock. Students participate in a newsroom setting in a variety of roles -- from writing and editing to pagination and layout -- to produce the Peacock in both print and online versions. Students will learn researching and writing techniques as well as how to interview and source stories for magazines. They will gain pre-professional experience preparing them for entry-level positions in magazine journalism – whether print publications or online magazines. Note: Up to 8 credits for Journalism Practica can be applied toward the degree.

GW Equivalency: SMPA 2110 Intro to NewsWriting&Reporting

 

CM 1851  - ONLINE NEWS JOURNALISM PRACTICUM 2 credits

This workshop trains students in online news writing and website curation through hands-on experience working on a news site in the style of Huffington Post, BuzzFeed, Daily Beast and similar sites. Students will participate in a variety of roles -- from editing and assigning to writing in specialized areas – to manage and curate an online news site in real time. Students will gain practical skills using different tools, including social media, while working a real digital newsroom setting. The course will prepare students for entry-level positions in digital journalism. Note: Up to 8 credits for Journalism Practica can be applied toward the degree

GW Equivalency: SMPA 2112 Intro to Video Production

 

CM 1852  - VIDEO JOURNALISM PRACTICUM 2 credits

This hands-on workshop trains students in video journalism in a real-time newsroom and production studio setting. Students will gain skills working with video production equipment and editing tools including Final Cut Pro. Students will contribute video journalism pieces to “PTV”, the video platform linked to the student media website where their video work contributes to the content mix of news pieces, video work, and magazine stories.  Students will produce short video stories, narratives and interviews for the site. They will edit video pieces, post on YouTube, and use social media to promote their stories. The course will prepare students for entry-level positions in video journalism and for more advanced AUP courses in video and broadcast journalism. Note: Up to 8 credits for Journalism Practica can be applied toward the degree

GW Equivalency: SMPA 2112 Intro to Video Production

 

CM/EC 2003  - MEDIA INDUSTRIES: STRATEGIES, MARKETS & CONSUMERS 4 credits

This course examines how the media industries – from movies and television to music and magazines – have been transformed by the disruptive impact of the Internet and new forms of consumer behavior. Economic terms such as “creative destruction” will help students understand how the Internet disrupted old media business models and shifted market power to consumers. Case studies include Apple’s impact on the music industry, the emergence of “streaming” services such as Netflix and Spotify, the decline of traditional print-based journalism with the emergence of online platforms, and Amazon’s transformation of the book industry.

GW Equivalency: IDIS 1099 VT: Media Ind: Strat, Mkt, Con

 

CS 1040  - INTRO TO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING I 5 credits

Introduces the field of computer science and the fundamental concepts of programming from an object-oriented perspective using the programming language Java. Starts with practical problem-solving and leads to the study and analysis of simple algorithms, data types, control structures, and use of simple data structures such as arrays and strings.

GW Equivalency: CSCI 1011 Intro to Programming w/ JAVA

 

CS/CM 1005  - INTRO TO WEB AUTHORING 2 credits

Introduces Web publishing in 12 sessions. Students will learn the basics of HTML and the use of at least one HTML editor. Site publishing including file structures, image and sound files will be covered.

GW Equivalency: CSCI 1099 VT: Intro to Web Authoring

 

Course CANCELLED:  DR/EN 2000  - THEATER ARTS 4 credits

 

FM 1010  - MODERN FILMS & THEIR MEANINGS 4 credits

How do contemporary films make meaning? How does cinematic language convey emotion and raise ideas? how do we, as contemporary spectators, relate to and make sense of the screen? This course, while centered on contemporary films, is an introduction to cinematic language, its techniques, and the social and cultural factors that have made it one of the most influential art forms of our time. Looking at international films from just the last 20 years, we will explore and discover the ways these films creatively explore ideas and look at the technological, economic and political forces that fuel their production. Together with readings and screenings, individual and group assignments will help students deepen their understanding of lectures, readings and films and develop new critical skills and aesthetic understanding.

GW Equivalency: FILM 2151 Film Theory

 

FM 2081  - DIRECTORS: ALFRED HITCHCOCK 4 credits

The course analyzes the work of one of the greatest, most influential film directors in the history of cinema, whose prodigious career spanned the silent and sound eras.  Hitchcock made major contributions first to British film, then to the classic Hollywood style. Students begin by establishing Hitchcock’s concept of pure cinema, and then trace the biographical origins of his fascination with “fright”. They also explore the major influences in his work.  The director’s move to American cinema focuses on his volatile work relationship with his producer, David Selznick, in films like Rebecca and Spellbound. A study of this transition culminates in an in-depth analysis of Hitchcock’s debt to the Surrealists, the subsequent fascination of the French New Wave for his works and his role as an inaugural auteur.  Hitchcock’s command of his craft and his technical innovation to create masterpieces of suspense transformed modern cinema.

GW Equivalency: FILM 1099 VT: Alfred Hitchcock

 

FM 2088  - SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY ON SCREEN 4 credits

From its earliest inceptions, cinema has been built out of and nurtured by the Science Fiction which dominated the end of the 19th Century.  Fantasy, a brainchild of the Enlightenment, has also had a profound impact on the early directions of cinema, notably with the work of Méliès.  Cinema has equally been fueled by rapid transitions in early 20th century developments in psychology, notably the Freudian concept of the uncanny.  Technological progress, the urban alienation associated with the Modernist aesthetic and the advent of wars fought through technologically advanced weaponry have contributed to a long-standing fascination with these cinematic genres.  This fascination is informed by these genres’ simultaneous escapist tendencies and their abilities to create striking allegories for the disturbing trends of the cinematic age.  In this course, students explore the themes of both fantasy and science fiction cinema, such as the dichotomy of utopias and dystopias; the “trucage” of the early screen and the eminent fear of apocalypse which pervades much of these genres’ canons throughout their evolutions. Pivotal theorists such as Gerard Genette, Tzevetan Todorov, Susan Sontag and others are considered in order to provide the intellectual backdrop for these genres’ progressive move into central cinematic areas of study.  The origins of the genres and the principal film directors who have shaped the genre are also analyzed in depth.

GW Equivalency: FILM 1099 VT: SciFi & Fantasy on Screen

 

FM 3078  - IBERIAN & LATIN AMERICAN CINEMA 4 credits

Offers an overview of the 'Iberian and Latin American New Wave': a group of national cinemas exploring contemporary societies of Latin America and the Iberian peninsula. Assesses how films problematize political and cultural issues such as dictatorial pasts, post-modern capitalist democracy, negotiating gender, sexual and racial identities in phallocentric post-colonial societies. The course is structured around screenings and class lectures/seminars.

GW Equivalency: FILM 1099 VT: Iberian & Lain Amer Cin

 

FR 1007  - INTRODUCTION TO PARISIAN CULTURE AND CUSTOMS 2 credits

In this course, you will become familiar with Paris and its residents, contributing to a global awareness and understanding of local habits, values, and way of life, as well as reflecting on your own. You will explore “the city of light” through a variety of in-class and outside activities and projects.

GW Equivalency: FREN 1099 VT: Intro Paris Culture & Cust

 

FR 1100  - FRENCH AND CULTURE I 4 credits

This course is an introduction to French and is intended to help students acquire the basic elements of spoken and written French. Students will learn how to express themselves in everyday life situations. The students’ basic needs for linguistic and cultural information will be the main focus of this course. In class, work will be supplemented by multimedia activities and real-life situations in the city of Paris.

GW Equivalency: FREN 1001 Basic French I

 

FR 1200  - FRENCH AND CULTURE II 4 credits

This course is a second semester Elementary French course, a continuation of level FR 1010 with emphasis on acquiring basic level of proficiency in the language and understanding the culture of France and the Francophone world. This course will enable students to improve their comprehension skills through the use of authentic audio and video material and to acquire vocabulary to face situations in their real life in Paris. The four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) are reinforced and special emphasis is placed on pronunciation.In-class work will be supplemented by multimedia activities and real-life situations in the City of Paris.

Prerequisite: FR1100 OR FR1200CCF

GW Equivalency: FREN 1002 Basic French II

 

FR 1300  - FRENCH AND CULTURE III 4 credits

The aim of the course is to improve and widen the listening, speaking and writing skills of those taking it, consolidating their knowledge of the full range of basic grammatical structures and broadening their general range of vocabulary.  By the end of the course, students should have reached approximately the level A2 standard on the Common European Framework References for Languages

Prerequisite: FR1200CCF OR FR1300CCI OR FR1200 OR FR1300

GW Equivalency: FREN 1099 VT: French Lang & Culture III

 

FR 2100  - FRENCH AND CULTURE IV 4 credits

This course reviews basic and complex sentence patterns in greater depth through discussions on students experience in Paris. Cultural and historical aspects of the French life are introduced. Students will learn additional vocabulary to express opinions, beliefs, doubts and emotions, and are shown various language registers (formal/informal vocabulary and structures) and intonations. Examples are taken from real life situations, film, television, newspaper articles, etc.The four language skills (listening, reading, speaking, writing) will be reinforced.

Prerequisite: FR1300CCI OR FR2100CCI

GW Equivalency: FREN 1003 Intermediate French I

 

FR 2200  - FRENCH LANGUAGE AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT 4 credits

This high intermediate course allows students to reinforce and expand their ability to express themselves, defend an opinion, and debate with others. Special attention is paid to increasing students' ability to form complex sentences to express attitudes, wishes, necessity, doubt, emotions, to link ideas and to speculate.

Prerequisite: FR2100CCI OR FR2200CCI OR FR2100 OR FR2200

GW Equivalency: FREN 1004 Intermediate French II

 

FR 2550  - ADV. GRAMMAR & COMPOSITION 4 credits

(formerly FR307 and FR2055)This course is designed for highly motivated students who plan to enroll in advanced French courses on campus or abroad. Heavy emphasis will be placed on individual work based on customized programs of study in chosen textbooks. Special attention will be given training on various forms of written French as well to a strengthening of the coherent structure of these writings.Class time will be devoted to analyzing the students’ trials and errors, through group discussions, review and quizzes. Taught in French.

Prerequisite: FR1300CCI OR FR2100CCI OR FR2200CCI

GW Equivalency: FREN 1099 VT: Adv Grammar & Comp

 

HI/ME 1015  - HISTORY OF THE MIDDLE EAST I 4 credits

This course surveys major themes in the ancient (pre-Islamic) and medieval history of the Middle East. It is organized around two parts.  The first surveys successive civilizations and empires that rose in the region or invaded and dominated it, from the Egyptians, the Assyrians, the Babylonians, the Hittites, the Phoenicians, the Persians, to the Greeks and the Romans/Byzantines. The birth of Judaism and Christianity is presented in this part.  The Second covers the rise of Islam, its expansion and the Caliphate it established from the 7th to the late 13th century, when the Mongol seized Bagdad.

GW Equivalency: HIST 3810 History of the Middle East

 

IL 1010  - ELEMENTARY ITALIAN I 4 credits

Introduces the Italian language with emphasis upon speaking, basic grammatical structure, with a particular focus on culture. Videos, CDs, plus a field trip to Venice, make this class an enjoyable challenge.

GW Equivalency: ITAL 1099 VT: Elementary Italian I

 

LI/FR 2060  - INTRO TO LINGUISTICS / A LA LINGUISTIQUE 4 credits

A bilingual survey of linguistics conducted in French and English. Combines theory and practice to introduce students to the basic concepts in phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. Focuses on the study of the human language as a system, the forms and functions of words and sentence elements, the creativity inherent in language systems, and language varieties. Prepares students to further investigate areas such as Historical linguistics, sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, language pathologies and first/second language acquisition.

GW Equivalency: LING 1099 VT: Intro to Linguistics

 

PL 2037  - EMPIRICISM, SKEPTICISM & MATERIALISM 4 credits

In this course we shall examine the birth of empiricism in polemics over the origins of knowledge and political authority, the limits of human reason, and the possibility of philosophy itself finding a way out of the seventeenth century's religious wars and tyranny towards the creation of free and tolerant societies of rational individuals. Readings from Descartes, Locke, Berkeley and Hume.

GW Equivalency: PHIL 1099 VT: Empiricism Skepticism Mat

 

PO 2031  - WORLD POLITICS 4 credits

This course analyses the basic setting, structure and dynamics of world politics with emphasis on current global problems, practices and processes. In doing so, it introduces the major theoretical approaches to international politics, and uses theory as a methodological tool for analyzing sources of change and causes of conflict and/or cooperation in the global arena.

GW Equivalency: PSC 1003 Intro-International Politics

 

PO 2050  - POLITICAL ANALYSIS 4 credits

This course examines the nature of knowledge claims in political science: how we know what we know and how certain we are. Research schools, the nature of description and explanation in political science, and basis issues of quantitative analysis will form the core elements of this course, while substantive themes may vary each year.

GW Equivalency: PSC 2101 Scope & Methods in PSc

 

PY 1000  - INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY 4 credits

This course discusses the intellectual foundations of contemporary psychology. Students learn about the concepts, theories and experiments basic to an understanding of the discipline, including classic thought and recent advances in psychology such as psychoanalysis, learning theory,biological mechanisms, developmental, social, cognitive, personality and abnormal psychology.

GW Equivalency: PSYC 1001 General Psychology

GW General Education Category: Note:  PSYC 1001 is a prerequisite for all Psychology courses.

 

PY/GS 2010  - PSYCHOLOGY & GENDER 4 credits

Surveys major issues concerning gender and the science of psychology in an attempt to answer the question: why is there such a gender gap when women and men share more psychological similarities than differences? Topics include: developmental processes and gender; gender roles and stereotypes, biology and gender; cross-cultural perspectives of gender; social-cultural theories of gender; language and gender, emotions and gender, health and gender.

GW Equivalency: PSYC 2550 Psychology of Sex Differences