Tulane First Year Abroad Courses

TULANE SPRING SCHOLARS COURSE LIST FALL 2022

Updated:  12 May 2022

 

TULANE CORE REQUIREMENT:  AESTHETICS AND CREATIVE ARTS

(TULANE REQUIRES 1 COURSE FROM THIS CATEGORY FOR GRADUATION)

 

AH2013  - RENAISSANCE ART & ARCHITECTURE CCI 4 credits

Surveys notable developments in painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy and in Northern Europe (late 13th-16th centuries). Emphasizes the origins of the Renaissance and the basic stylistic evolution from Early to High Renaissance and Mannerism. Explores the ramifications of the Italian Renaissance mode as it came into contact with other historical and cultural traditions in Northern Europe.

Tulane Education Note: Aesthetics & Creative Arts, Global Perspectives, Western Traditions

Tulane Course Equivalency: ARHS 3910

 

CL2100  - INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING: A CROSS-GENRE WORKSHOP CCR 4 credits

In this course, students practice writing fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry while exploring the boundaries between genres. The workshop format includes guided peer critique of sketches, poems, and full-length works presented in class and discussion and analysis of literary models. In Fall, students concentrate on writing techniques. In Spring, the workshop is theme-driven. May be taken twice for credit.

Tulane Education Note: Aesthetics & Creative Arts

Tulane Course Equivalency: ENGL 3620

 

TULANE CORE REQUIREMENT:  FIRST-TIER WRITING

(TULANE REQUIRES 1 COURSE [ENGL 1010 OR ENGL 1011] FROM THIS CATEGORY FOR GRADUATION)

 

EN1010 - COLLEGE WRITING  4 credits

Taught through thematically-linked works of literature from the Ancient world to the present day. Stresses expository writing, accurate expression, and logical organization of ideas in academic writing. Recent themes include: Childhood, Friendship from Aristotle to Derrida, Social Organization and Alienation, Monstrosity, and Music and Literature. This course satisfies only 4 credits of the University's English requirement.

Prerequisite: EN1000 OR EN1010

Tulane Education Note: First Tier Writing

Tulane Course Equivalency: ENGL 1010

 

TULANE CORE REQUIREMENT:  FOREIGN LANGUAGE

(0-3 COURSES NEEDED TO SATISFY THIS REQUIREMENT FOR GRADUATION, DEPENDING ON PLACEMENT LEVEL AND CERTAIN PRE-MATRICULATION TEST SCORES)

 

FR2200 - FRENCH AND CULTURE V CCI 4 credits

This high intermediate course will allow students to reach the B1+ CEFR (DELF) competencies by reinforcing and expanding their ability to express themselves, defend an opinion, and debate with others. Special attention is paid to increasing students' ability to form complex sentences to express attitudes, wishes, necessity, doubt, emotions, to link ideas and to speculate. A B1.1 level in French or a passing grade in a French and Culture IV class (FR 2100) is required.

Spontaneously and through active workshops and discussion, they will react and express their point of view on contemporary subjects and questions, such as access to knowledge (university or other) for all, the gaze on information at a time of “fake news” and the over-multiplication of distribution channels (Internet, social networks, etc.), the representation of so-called “visible” minorities in the media sphere, or the consequences of global warming on countries and their inhabitants...

Through learning that is both individual and collective, debates on ideas based on their past and current experiences in and out of class, but also a constant questioning of their representations, students will thus be encouraged to develop, in addition to their linguistic and cultural skills, their critical thinking and to better understand contemporary issues.

Prerequisite: FR2100CCI OR FR2100 OR FR2200 OR FR2200CCI

Tulane Education Note: Foreign Language: satisfies requirement

Tulane Course Equivalency: FREN 2030

 

TULANE CORE REQUIREMENT:  FORMAL REASONING

(TULANE REQUIRES 1 COURSE FROM THIS CATEGORY FOR GRADUATION)

 

MA1020 - APPLIED STATISTICS I CCM 4 credits

Introduces the tools of statistical analysis. Combines theory with extensive data collection and computer-assisted laboratory work. Develops an attitude of mind accepting uncertainty and variability as part of problem analysis and decision-making. Topics include: exploratory data analysis and data transformation, hypothesis-testing and the analysis of variance, simple and multiple regression with residual and influence analyses.

Corequisite: MA0900 OR MA1005CCM OR MA1030CCM OR MA1091CCM OR ELECMA-25 OR ELECMA-30 OR ELECMA-20 OR MA1025CCM

Tulane Education Note: Formal Reasoning, Math & Natural Science (to verify with Shelby)

Tulane Course Equivalency: MATH 1110

 

MA1030 - CALCULUS I CCM 4 credits

Introduces differential and integral calculus. Develops the concepts of calculus as applied to polynomials, logarithmic, and exponential functions. Topics include: limits, derivatives, techniques of differentiation, applications to extrema and graphing; the definite integral; the fundamental theorem of calculus, applications; logarithmic and exponential functions, growth and decay; partial derivatives. Appropriate for students in the biological, management, computer and social sciences.

Tulane Education Note: Formal Reasoning, Math & Natural Science

Tulane Course Equivalency: MATH 1310

 

TULANE CORE REQUIREMENT:  SCIENCE WITH LABORATORY

** This is part of the "Mathematics and the Natural Sciences" Distribution category, for which two courses are needed for graduation from Tulane and one needs to be a lab science course**

 

SC1020 - ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE CCS 4 credits

This course is intended to introduce non-scientists to key concepts and approaches in the study of the environment. With a focus on the scientific method, we learn about natural systems using case studies of disruptions caused by human activity. Topics include global warming, deforestation, waste production and recycling, water pollution, environmental toxins and sustainable development. The relationships between science and policy, the media, and citizen action are also addressed. Must take lab. Please note that an additional fee will be charged for this course.

Corequisite: SC1020LLAB AND (MA1005CCM OR MA1020CCM OR MA1025CCM OR MA1030CCM OR MA1091CCM OR ELECMA-30 OR CCMCCM OR MA1010)

Tulane Education Note: Science with Laboratory

Tulane Course Equivalency: EENS 1300/EENS 1305

 

TULANE CORE REQUIREMENT:  SOCIAL/BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

(TULANE REQUIRES 2 COURSES FROM THIS CATEGORY FOR GRADUATION)

Please note that certain courses in this category also count toward the Global Perspectives requirement. In this case, credit is earned toward both requirements.

 

AN1002 - SOCIO-CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY CCI 4 credits

Sociocultural anthropology is the comparative study of human societies and cultures.  This course is designed to introduce students to central areas of anthropological inquiry, a range of key theoretical perspectives and the discipline’s holistic approach.  Through field-based research projects, students will also gain familiarity with the discipline’s qualitative research methods (especially participant observation).   While students will encounter the works of key historical figures in the discipline, they will also discover current debates on globalization and transnationalism.   Finally, this course also strives to cultivate students’ ability to reflect critically on their own identities and cultures, thereby gaining a greater understanding and appreciation for diversity and an improved set of intercultural communication skills.

Tulane Education Note: Social/Behavioral Sciences, Global Perspectives, Perspectives - Non European,

Tulane Course Equivalency: ANTH 1020

 

EC2010 - PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS  4 credits

Focuses on the role played by relative market prices in our society and on the forces of market supply and demand in determining these prices. Since the actions of consumers and firms underlie supply and demand, the course studies in detail the behavior of these two groups.

Tulane Education Note: Social/Behavioral Sciences

Tulane Course Equivalency: ECON 1010

 

EC2020 - PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS  4 credits

Examines the determinants of the levels of national income, employment, rates of interest, and prices. Studies in detail the instruments of monetary and fiscal policy, highlighting the domestic and international repercussions of their implementation.

Tulane Education Note: Social & Behavioral Sci

Tulane Course Equivalency: ECON 1020

 

GS2045  - SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY CCI 4 credits

Studies the nature and causes of individual behavior and thought in social situations. Presents the basic fields of study that compose the science of social psychology, and how its theories impact on most aspects of people's lives. Topics of study include: conformity, persuasion, mass communication, propaganda, aggression, attraction, prejudice, and altruism.

Tulane Education Note: Social & Behavioral Sci

Tulane Course Equivalency: PSYC 3430

 

PO2031 - WORLD POLITICS  4 credits

This course analyses the basic setting, structure and dynamics of world politics with emphasis on current global problems, practices and processes. In doing so, it introduces the major theoretical approaches to international politics, and uses theory as a methodological tool for analyzing sources of change and causes of conflict and/or cooperation in the global arena.

Tulane Education Note: Social & Behavioral Sci, Global Perspectives

Tulane Course Equivalency: POLI 2500

 

TULANE CORE REQUIREMENT:  TEXTUAL/HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

(TULANE REQUIRES 2 COURSES FROM THIS CATEGORY FOR GRADUATION)

Please note that certain courses in this category also count toward the Global Perspectives requirement. In this case, credit is earned toward both requirements.

 

EN1000 - PRINCIPLES OF ACADEMIC WRITING  4 credits

Emphasizes the stages required to produce a polished, articulate essay by practicing the necessary components of excellent academic writing: sharpening critical thinking skills, organizing ideas, choosing appropriate and dynamic words, varying prose style, editing, refining, and proofreading. Although this course carries 4 credits, it does not fulfill the University's English requirement.

Tulane Education Note: Textual & Hist Perspect

Tulane Course Equivalency: COMM 1150

 

FM1010  - MODERN FILMS & THEIR MEANINGS CCI 4 credits

How do contemporary films make meaning? How does cinematic language convey emotion and raise ideas? how do we, as contemporary spectators, relate to and make sense of the screen? This course, while centered on contemporary films, is an introduction to cinematic language, its techniques, and the social and cultural factors that have made it one of the most influential art forms of our time. Looking at international films from just the last 20 years, we will explore and discover the ways these films creatively explore ideas and look at the technological, economic and political forces that fuel their production. Together with readings and screenings, individual and group assignments will help students deepen their understanding of lectures, readings and films and develop new critical skills and aesthetic understanding.

Tulane Education Note: Textual & Hist Perspect

Tulane Course Equivalency: COMM 1150

 

PL1100  - HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY I: FROM ANCIENT TO MEDIEVAL CCI 4 credits

This course offers an overview of ancient and medieval philosophy. Beginning with the earliest Greek philosophers and ending with the late medieval founding fathers of modern scientific thought, we will read and discuss various answers these thinkers gave to questions such as: 'What is a good life?' or 'How can I reconcile my faith with what reason tells me?' Readings include Parmenides, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Seneca, Plotinus, Anselm, Avicenna, Abelard, Maimonides, Thomas Aquinas and Nicolaus of Autrecourt.

Tulane Education Note: Global Perspectives, Textual & Hist Perspect, Western Traditions, Writing Tier-1

Tulane Course Equivalency: PHIL 2010

 

THE FOLLOWING COURSES HAVE BEEN APPROVED BY TULANE BUT DO NOT EARN CORE CURRICULUM CREDIT.

DEPENDING ON THEIR TULANE COURSE EQUIVALENCY, THE BELOW COURSES MAY BE APPLIED TOWARD YOUR INTENDED MAJOR AT TULANE:

 

AB1010  - ELEMENTARY ARABIC I  4 credits

This course is designed to familiarize beginners with the Arabic alphabet system and Arabic writing as well as provide the basis for limited conversation.

Tulane Course Equivalency: ARBC 1940

 

AB1030  - INTERMEDIATE ARABIC I  4 credits

After studying the principles of morphological derivation which makes the students able to structure their understanding of the vocabulary production system, the course focuses on producing small texts expressing the students’ opinion and description of the material seen during the sessions. AB 530 gives the opportunity to go beyond simple contact and to interact in Arabic within the fields covered by the different documents. The field covered by the didactic documents broadens out to short authentic texts, short articles and literary production, as well as authentic documents such as letters, cards, advertisings, announcements…

Tulane Course Equivalency: ARBC 1020

 

AH1003 - INTRO TO ART THROUGH PARIS MUSEUMS CCI 4 credits

Uses the unsurpassed richness of the art museums of Paris as the principal teaching resource. The history of Western Art is studied through the close examination of a limited selection of major works in a variety of media. The works chosen illuminate the political, social and religious contexts of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Baroque and Rococo periods, and the modern epoch. The course has an extra course fee of 35 euros.

Tulane Course Equivalency: ARHS 3910 (Special Topics in Art History)

 

AH1020  - INTRO TO WESTERN ART II CCI 4 credits

Continues the study of the most significant monuments of Western painting, sculpture, and architecture, from the Renaissance to the 20th-century. Emphasizes historical context, continuity, and critical analysis. Includes direct contact with works of art in Parisian museums.

Tulane Course Equivalency: ARHS 1020

 

AH2000  - PARIS THROUGH ITS ARCHITECTURE I CCI 4 credits

Investigates the growth patterns of Paris from Roman times through the Second Empire. Studies major monuments, pivotal points of urban design, and vernacular architecture on site. Presents the general vocabulary of architecture, the history of French architecture and urban planning, as well as a basic knowledge of French history to provide a framework for understanding the development of Paris.

Course Fee: 20

Tulane Course Equivalency: ARHS 1940

 

AH2018  - ART AND THE MARKET  4 credits

Investigates economic and financial aspects of art over several historical periods. Examines painting, sculpture, drawing, and decorative arts as marketable products, analyzing them from the perspective of patrons, collectors, investors, and speculators. Studies artists as entrepreneurs. Assesses diverse functions and forms of influence exercised by art market specialists: critics, journalists, public officials, auctioneers, museum professionals, experts, and dealers.

Tulane Course Equivalency: ARHS 3910

 

AN3060  - THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF FOOD  4 credits

This course examines the intersection of food and the senses from an anthropological perspective. We will explore the intersection between food and culture; the impact of social, political and economic contexts on our foods and foodways; French food culture; and taste, cuisine and commensality as forms of inter-cultural communication. Students apply class readings and practice ethnographic methodologies in a few short study trips.

Tulane Course Equivalency: ANTH 2940

 

BA2040 A - MARKETING IN A GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT  4 credits

This introductory marketing course develops students’ understanding of the principles of marketing and their use in international business. Students learn how to collect and analyze data sets to make marketing decisions with the goal of understanding customers wants, demands, and needs; they learn marketing from a strategic and functional point of view. With a focus on problem solving, students work in multicultural teams cultivating a greater sensitivity to cultural issues while improving communication skills. Students will consider marketing in the French, US, and international marketplace.

Tulane Course Equivalency: SLAM 3030 or BSMK 3200

 

BA2040 B - MARKETING IN A GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT  4 credits

This introductory marketing course develops students’ understanding of the principles of marketing and their use in international business. Students learn how to collect and analyze data sets to make marketing decisions with the goal of understanding customers wants, demands, and needs; they learn marketing from a strategic and functional point of view. With a focus on problem solving, students work in multicultural teams cultivating a greater sensitivity to cultural issues while improving communication skills. Students will consider marketing in the French, US, and international marketplace.

Tulane Course Equivalency: SLAM 3030 or BSMK 3200

 

BA2040 C - MARKETING IN A GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT  4 credits

This introductory marketing course develops students’ understanding of the principles of marketing and their use in international business. Students learn how to collect and analyze data sets to make marketing decisions with the goal of understanding customers wants, demands, and needs; they learn marketing from a strategic and functional point of view. With a focus on problem solving, students work in multicultural teams cultivating a greater sensitivity to cultural issues while improving communication skills. Students will consider marketing in the French, US, and international marketplace.

Tulane Course Equivalency: SLAM 3030 or BSMK 3200

 

CL2006  - CONTEMPORARY FEMINIST THEORY CCI 4 credits

Introduces the methodology of Gender Studies and the theory upon which it is based. Examines contemporary debates across a range of issues now felt to be of world-wide feminist interest: sexuality, reproduction, production, writing, representation, culture, race, and politics. Encourages responsible theorizing across disciplines and cultures.

Tulane Course Equivalency: GESS 2910

 

CL1025  - THE WORLD, THE TEXT, AND THE CRITIC I CCI 4 credits

Considers closely three moments when the practice of writing changed radically in response to historical and cultural processes, from Ancient Greece to 1800 (specific contents change each year). Investigates the forces that inform creative imagination and cultural production. Places those moments and those forces within a geographical and historical map of literary production, and introduces the tools of literary analysis.

Tulane Course Equivalency: ENLS 1940

 

CM1011  - JOURNALISM: WRITING & REPORTING CCR 4 credits

The introductory course provides students with basic training in writing and reporting in all forms of journalism, print and online. The course gives students with a grounding in the basic principles and practices of the journalism profession: accuracy, fairness, objectivity. Students will learn journalistic writing techniques as well as style and tone. They will analyze possible sources, define angles, and learn to write a hard news story. The course will provide workshop training for students involved in ASM courses focused on the Peacock Plume website.

Tulane Course Equivalency: COMM 2810

 

CM1023 - INTRO TO MEDIA & COMMUNICATION STUDIES  4 credits

This course provides a survey of the media and its function in today’s society. It introduces students to the basic concepts and tools necessary to think critically about media institutions and practices. In addition to the analysis of diverse media texts, the course considers wider strategies and trends in marketing, distribution, audience formation and the consequences of globalization. By semester’s end, students will understand the basic structures of today’s media and be able to provide advanced analysis that weighs the social and political implications of its products.

Tulane Course Equivalency: COMM 2810

 

CM1500 - DIGITAL TOOLKIT: COMMUNICATION DESIGN PRACTICUM  4 credits

In this digital tools training course, students will learn skills and gain hands-on experience with a range of digital publishing tools to build and curate a web platform with compelling, sharable content. They will become familiar with key storytelling platforms and technologies including Wordpress, Tumblr, Vine, Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. They will acquire hands---on experience with essential software including Adobe's Photoshop, Illustrator, Encoder, and Final Cut Pro; and they will learn to manipulate HTML and CSS with a basic Integrated Design Environment. In this highly hands---on course, students will learn basic web design and work collaboratively to create and launch a dynamic new digital brand online.

Tulane Course Equivalency: DMPC 1940

 

CM2003  - MEDIA INDUSTRIES: STRATEGIES, MARKETS & CONSUMERS  4 credits

This course examines how the media industries – from movies and television to music and magazines – have been transformed by the disruptive impact of the Internet and new forms of consumer behavior. Economic terms such as “creative destruction” will help students understand how the Internet disrupted old media business models and shifted market power to consumers. Case studies include Apple’s impact on the music industry, the emergence of “streaming” services such as Netflix and Spotify, the decline of traditional print-based journalism with the emergence of online platforms, and Amazon’s transformation of the book industry.

Tulane Course Equivalency: COMM 2810

 

CM2004  - COMPARATIVE COMMUNICATIONS HISTORY  4 credits

This course provides historical background to understand how contemporary communication practices and technologies have developed and are in the process of developing and reflects on what communication has been in different human societies across time and place. It considers oral and literate cultures, the development of writing systems, of printing, and different cultural values assigned to the image. The parallel rise of mass media and modern western cultural and political forms and the manipulation and interplay of the properties and qualities conveyed by speech, sight, and sound are studied with reference to the printed book, newspapers, photography, radio, cinema, television, new media.

Tulane Course Equivalency: COMM 2810

 

CM2006 - MEDIA GLOBALIZATION  4 credits

What is globalization? Why study the media? What is the relationship between the media and globalization? What are the consequences of media globalization on our lives and identities? This course critically explores these questions and challenging issues that confront us today. Globalization can be understood as a multi-dimensional, complex process of profound transformations in all spheres – technological, economic, political, social, cultural, intimate and personal. Yet much of the current debates of globalization tend to be concerned with “out there” macro-processes, rather than what is happening “in here,” in the micro-processes of our lives. This course explores both the macro and the micro. It encourages students to develop an enlarged way of thinking – challenging existing paradigms and providing comparative perspectives.

Tulane Course Equivalency: COMM 3810

 

CM2051  - COMMUNICATION THEORY & RESEARCH METH. CCR 4 credits

The skills learned in this course will prepare students for upper-division communication courses, and provide students with basic research methods in the field of communication. Students will become familiar with a range of research methods (survey, interview, ethnography, discourse, and political economy.

Tulane Course Equivalency: COMM 3810

 

CM3052  - RHETORIC & PERSUASION  4 credits

Studies rhetoric as a historical phenomenon and as a practical reality. Considers how words and images are used to convince and persuade individuals of positions, arguments or actions to undertake, with particular attention to advertising, politics and culture. Studies the use of reason, emotion, and commonplaces, and compares visual and verbal techniques of persuasion.

Tulane Course Equivalency: COMM 3810

 

EN2020 - WRITING & CRITICISM CCE 4 credits

A series of topic-centered courses refining the skills of academic essay writing, studying a wide range of ideas as expressed in diverse literary genres and periods. Introduces the analysis of literary texts and gives training in the writing of critical essays and research papers. Recent topics include: Utopia and Anti-Utopia, City as Metaphor, Portraits of Women, Culture Conflict, and Labyrinths.

Tulane Course Equivalency: ENLS 2104 (Special Topics in English)

 

FR1100 - FRENCH AND CULTURE I  4 credits

This course is an introduction to French and is intended to help students acquire the basic elements of spoken and written French. Students will learn how to express themselves in everyday life situations. The students’ basic needs for linguistic and cultural information will be the main focus of this course. In class, work will be supplemented by multimedia activities and real-life situations in the city of Paris.

Tulane Course Equivalency: FREN 1940

 

FR1200 - FRENCH AND CULTURE II CCF 4 credits

This course is a second semester Elementary French course, a continuation of level FR 1010 with emphasis on acquiring basic level of proficiency in the language and understanding the culture of France and the Francophone world. This course will enable students to improve their comprehension skills through the use of authentic audio and video material and to acquire vocabulary to face situations in their real life in Paris. The four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) are reinforced and special emphasis is placed on pronunciation.In-class work will be supplemented by multimedia activities and real-life situations in the City of Paris.

Prerequisite: FR1100 OR FR1200 OR FR1200CCF

Tulane Course Equivalency: FREN 1010

 

FR1300 - FRENCH AND CULTURE III CCI 4 credits

The aim of the course is to improve and widen the listening, speaking and writing skills of those taking it, consolidating their knowledge of the full range of basic grammatical structures and broadening their general range of vocabulary.  By the end of the course, students should have reached approximately the level A2 standard on the Common European Framework References for Languages

Prerequisite: FR1200CCF OR FR1300CCI OR FR1200 OR FR1300

Tulane Course Equivalency: FREN 1020

 

FR2100 - FRENCH AND CULTURE IV CCI 4 credits

This course reviews basic and complex sentence patterns in greater depth through discussions on students experience in Paris. Cultural and historical aspects of the French life are introduced. Students will learn additional vocabulary to express opinions, beliefs, doubts and emotions, and are shown various language registers (formal/informal vocabulary and structures) and intonations. Examples are taken from real life situations, film, television, newspaper articles, etc.The four language skills (listening, reading, speaking, writing) will be reinforced.

Prerequisite: FR1300CCI OR FR1300 OR FR2100 OR FR2100CCI

Tulane Course Equivalency: FREN 2940

 

GK1005  - ELEMENTARY ANCIENT GREEK I  4 credits

This is a course for beginners. By reading simple ancient Greek texts and trying to write (or, if you like, speak) some Greek yourself, you learn the first grammar essentials and acquire a basic vocabulary of c. 1000 words. Choice of a particular textbook and specialization on particular aspects, e.g. Greek for students of philosophy, is possible.

Tulane Course Equivalency: GREK 1010

 

GS2010  - INTRODUCTION TO GENDER, SEXUALITY, AND SOCIETY CCI 4 credits

Surveys major issues concerning gender and the science of psychology in an attempt to answer the question: why is there such a gender gap when women and men share more psychological similarities than differences? Topics include: developmental processes and gender; gender roles and stereotypes, biology and gender; cross-cultural perspectives of gender; social-cultural theories of gender; language and gender, emotions and gender, health and gender.

Tulane Course Equivalency: GESS 2190 or PSYC 3940

 

LT1001  - ELEMENTARY LATIN I  4 credits

This is a Latin course for beginners. By reading simple Latin texts and trying to write (or, if you like, speak) some Latin yourself, you learn the first grammar essentials and acquire a basic passive vocabulary of c. 1000 words. Choice of a particular textbook and specialization on particular aspects, e.g. Medieval Latin, is possible.

Tulane Course Equivalency: LATN 1010

 

PL/ PO 2003  - POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY CCI 4 credits

Political philosophy forms that branch of philosophy that reflects on the specificity of the political. Why are humans, as Aristotle argued, political animals? How are they political? What are the means and ends of the political, and how best does one organize the political with such questions in mind? The course offers a topic-oriented approach to the fundamental problems underlying political theory and practice.

Tulane Course Equivalency: PHIL 3560

 

PO2050  - POLITICAL ANALYSIS  4 credits

This course examines the nature of knowledge claims in political science: how we know what we know and how certain we are. Research schools, the nature of description and explanation in political science, and basis issues of quantitative analysis will form the core elements of this course, while substantive themes may vary each year.

Tulane Course Equivalency: POLS 2010

 

PY1000 - INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY CCI 4 credits

This course discusses the intellectual foundations of contemporary psychology. Students learn about the concepts, theories and experiments basic to an understanding of the discipline, including classic thought and recent advances in psychology such as psychoanalysis, learning theory,biological mechanisms, developmental, social, cognitive, personality and abnormal psychology.

Tulane Course Equivalency: PSYC 1940